A Less Than Desirable Milestone

I’ve dealt with difficult clients, we all have. They’re the ones who are forgetful, disorganized and bad communicators.  They get upset at people who don’t come to the same conclusion they do.  They literally wonder why you can’t read their mind.  They have the worst email etiquette. They change their strategies on a fly and forget to tell you. They have incompetent assistants.  They’re always unavailable. 

And then there are abusive clients. I dealt with my first one this week.

I was on a conference call with a coworker in my office, door closed. The yelling coming from the phone was heard by people in the conference room next door.  He berated us, asking if we were on drugs for making certain decisions.  He would scream “you mean to tell me you don’t know the difference between ____ and ____ ? YES OR NO? IT’S A SIMPLE QUESTION! YES OR NO?!” 

This is also a client who refuses to be copied on emails, and hired an in-house PR/marketing manager but then denied her any authority or decision making power, essentially making her useless.  Our emails go through his Executive Assistant, who becomes a de facto person of authority but has none.  

What a friggin’ mess. 

Robin Williams: Where were you when you first heard the news?

If you are between the ages of 30-65, then I am certain that the news of actor Robin Williams’ death by apparent suicide is soul crushing in a way that twentysomethings and the octogenarians may not understand completely. 

What a tragic death. What a brilliant performer. 

For me, one of the most difficult things to comprehend early on was how the news could come from this press release from the Marin County Sheriff’s Department.  Such a stark, cold, official document.  How could this be the messenger of death? Robin Williams was so funny, kindhearted and beloved by all.  How could the news of his death come from a PDF Word document? Stranger yet, I saw the link to the PDF via Twitter. 

The world lost an incredible father, husband, actor and man struggling with depression today. 

A really cool experience while working with USO.  In 2013, USO started its first national grassroots fundraising campaign called Barbecue For The Troops, which called on all Americans to throw a quintessential summer backyard BBQ and turn it into a fundraiser for the troops.  As part of our media relations outreach, we had Bob Kurkjian, the Executive Director of the Bob Hope Center at LAX on air with military veteran and “Dancing With The Stars” winner JR Martinez.

JR could not have been more gracious and easy to talk to.  He ultimately declined our request to serve as a spokesperson for the USO’s next campaign called “Dance For The Troops,” but I’m still a big fan. 

In a randomized double-blind study female students were less likely to be hired because they were viewed as less competent. And if your name gives you away, you could be in trouble, too. People with hard to pronounce names are less likely to get hired. Inside The Complicated Mess Of Discrimination And Diversity In Hiring (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

prweek:

On April 15, an Islamist terrorist group abducted nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls, but it was weeks before the media and politicians paid attention. Now the hashtag associated with the campaign to rescue the girls, #BringBackOurGirls, has received nearly one million mentions on Twitter. Here’s how social media helped bring the missing girls into the spotlight. (via Mashable).

Random FYI about me: I modeled my signature after Jackie Robinson.  I saw a photo of a baseball he signed—probably middle school?—and I loved the elegant script of the capitalized “J” in Jackie.  I still sign my name the same way. 
life:

January 31, 1919: Jackie Robinson is born.
For most of Jackie Robinson’s long journey, from 1947 Rookie of the Year to prematurely aged Dodgers veteran (his major league career lasted only 10 years), LIFE magazine was there, chronicling his baseball triumphs — including Brooklyn’s only World Series title, in 1955 — and his life and achievements away from the diamond. See more photos of Jackie here.
(J.R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Random FYI about me: I modeled my signature after Jackie Robinson.  I saw a photo of a baseball he signed—probably middle school?—and I loved the elegant script of the capitalized “J” in Jackie.  I still sign my name the same way. 

life:

January 31, 1919: Jackie Robinson is born.

For most of Jackie Robinson’s long journey, from 1947 Rookie of the Year to prematurely aged Dodgers veteran (his major league career lasted only 10 years), LIFE magazine was there, chronicling his baseball triumphs — including Brooklyn’s only World Series title, in 1955 — and his life and achievements away from the diamond. See more photos of Jackie here.

(J.R. Eyerman—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

wwdonpaper:

—Millard Drexler, Chairman & CEO, J. Crew Group

wwdonpaper:

Millard Drexler, Chairman & CEO, J. Crew Group

(via womensweardaily)

Alas, I was there. 
siphotos:

Vince Young scores the game-winning touchdown to beat USC during the Rose Bowl in Jan. 2006. (Robert Beck/SI)
BCS CHAMPIONSHIP CONTENT: SI previews the national championship

Alas, I was there. 

siphotos:

Vince Young scores the game-winning touchdown to beat USC during the Rose Bowl in Jan. 2006. (Robert Beck/SI)

BCS CHAMPIONSHIP CONTENT: SI previews the national championship